Generally, secure web use encryption and authentication standards to protect the confidentiality of website transactions.

Currently, the foremost commonly used protocol for internet security is TLS, or Transport Layer Security. This technology continues to be commonly referred to as SSL, or Secure Sockets Layer, a predecessor to TLS. Additionally to providing security for hypertext transfer protocol (web hypertext http) transactions, TLS works with other TCP/IP standards like IMAP mail and LDAP directory access. For a security standard like TLS/SSL to work, your browser and also the web server should each be configured to use it.

When you hook up with a website using TLS, your browser asks the server to authenticate itself, or ensure its identity. The authentication process uses cryptography to verify that a trusted independent third party, or certificate authority, like Comodo or VeriSign, has registered and identified the server. TLS can also authenticate connecting users or their computers.

In addition, TLS encrypts the data that you just send, and incorporates a mechanism for detecting any alteration in transit, so that eavesdropping or tampering with web traffic is almost not possible. this can be essential for safely transmittal highly confidential information like credit card numbers.

Nearly all current browsers are set up by default to accept SSL certificates from most established certificate authorities, you will see lock icon on your browser address bar which mean it secured.

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